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OVERVIEW

This course fulfills several purposes.  First, it completes the MN state geography requirement.  Second, since this is an AP course, you could also earn college credit. Third, it will give you a basic introduction to the wonderfully vast study that is HUMAN geography. And fourth, it will provide you with a perspective on the world today and the issues we face as a planet that you previously may have never imagined.

The common thread that will weave through the course is that of globalization.  This phenomenon has brought you closer to every other person on earth economically, environmentally, technologically, and culturally.  Our greatest achievements and our greatest challenges will arrive as the world’s nations and peoples become more and more interdependent. The goal is for students to better understand the changing nature of our world today. Below is a list of the units we will cover this semester.

 

AP Exam

Since this is an A.P. class there is a test that will be administered on May 13, 2016.  The hope is that all students will choose to take the exam in an attempt to earn college credit.

You should expect to have work for this course EVERY DAY and since much of the material builds upon itself, it will be imperative that you strive to keep up with readings and note-taking as well as all the written assignments.  We may not be able to discuss EVERYTHING you need to know for the A.P. test in class so it will be your responsibility to ask questions about things you do not understand.  If you require extra assistance you certainly can make an appointment before or after school or simply come in before school for help.

Sometime in late April, Mr. Ramlet, Mr. Quinn, Mr. Buszta and Mr. Nohel will have after school review sessions to get students ready for the A.P. test.  There are also study books available from local booksellers for the advanced placement human geography test.  Both the Barron’s and the Kaplan books have their pluses.  We will provide some of those materials and it is advisable to obtain a book of your own if you are planning to take the test.

Units of Study

Quarter 1:

I. Nature of & Perspectives on Geography-C1-The course provides a systematic study of human geography, including the topics outlined below. C2 The course teaches the use of spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human organization of space.

Essential Questions:

  • How do geographers describe where things are?
  • Why are different places similar?
  • Why and how are resources being depleted?

          A. Why Places Matter

          B.  Interdependence in a Globalizing World

          C. Studying Human Geography

          D. Nature as a Concept

          E. The Transformation of Earth by Ancient Humans

          F. Transformation, Expansion, and Globalization of the Environment

          Text: Chapters 1, 4

II. Political Organization of Space- C2 The course teaches the use of spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human organization of space.

Essential Questions:

  • How and why did states, nations and international organizations develop?
  • How have ethnicity and nationalism led to conflict and, more recently, terrorism?

          A. Development of Political Geography

          B. States and Nations

          C. International Organizations

          D. The 2 Way Street of Politics and Geography    

          Text: Chapter 9

III. Industrialization and Economic Development-C3 The course teaches spatial relationships at different scales ranging from the local to the global. C4 The course teaches students how to use and interpret maps, data sets, and geographic models. GIS aerial photographs, and satellite images, though not required, can be used effectively

Essential Questions:

  • How is development measured?
  • How does the level of development vary among regions and countries?
  • How can countries promote development?

          A. Patterns of Economic Development

          B. Pathways to Regional Development

          C. Globalization and Economic Development

          Text: Chapter 2,7

IV. Cities and Urban Land Use- C2 The course teaches the use of spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human organization of space; C4 The course teaches students how to use and interpret maps, data sets, and geographic models. GIS aerial photographs, and satellite images, though not required, can be used effectively.

Essential Questions:

  • What activities and problems are associated with the inner-city and central business district of a major urban center?
  • What are the causes and consequences of suburbanization?
  • How are different social, economic, and ethnic groups distributed within an urban area?

          A. Urban Origins

          B. Urban Systems

          C. Globalization and Splintering Urbanism

          D. Urban Land Use and Spatial Organization

          E. Traditional Patterns of Urban Structure

          F. New Patterns: The Polycentric Metropolis

          Text: Chapters 10, 11  

Quarter 2

V. Population-C2 The course teaches the use of spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human organization of space; C4 The course teaches students how to use and interpret maps, data sets, and geographic models. GIS aerial photographs, and satellite images, though not required, can be used effectively

Essential Questions:

  • How is world population distributed?
  • How has the world’s population increased?
  • Why is population increasing at different rates in different countries?
  • How has migration manifested itself over time in different places?

          A. Distribution and Structure

          B. Dynamics and Processes

          C. Movement and Migration

          D. Debates and Policies

          Text: Chapter 3

VI. Agricultural and Rural Land Use- C4 The course teaches students how to use and interpret maps, data sets, and geographic models. GIS aerial photographs, and satellite images, though not required, can be used effectively

Essential Questions:

  • How did agriculture originate and diffuse?
  • How and why does agriculture vary from developed to less developed countries?

          A. Traditional Agricultural Geography

          B. Agricultural Revolution and Industrialization

          C. Global Restructuring of Agricultural Systems

          D. Social and Technological Change in Global Food Production

          E. The Environment and Agricultural Industrialization

          F. Problems and Prospects in the Global Food System

          Text: Chapter 8

VII. Cultural Geographies-C3 The course teaches spatial relationships at different scales ranging from the local to the global.

Essential Questions:

  • How are religions distributed?
  • How do religions affect and organize space and landscape? How can this lead to conflict?
  • How are languages distributed?

          A. Cultural Systems

          B. Culture and Identity

          C. Islamic Nationalism

          Text: Chapter 5

 

Grading Policy

Completion of assignments

  1. All assignments except notes and tests must be typed, double spaced, or  done in ink, or will not be accepted. It is preferred that all typed assignments should be either emailed in or turned in via school’s Google  Docs
  2. All assignments will be turned in on time or early. Late assignments will not be accepted.
  3. Students who do not do all of the required work will fail the class.

Grading Scale

Students who do all of the requied will be graded based on the following scale. It is possible for a student to pass one quarter and fail in the other quarter.


"A+"=99%-100%
"A" =93%-98%
"A-"=90%-92%

"B+"=87%-89%
"B" =83%-86%
"B-"=80%-82%

"C+"=77%-79%
"C" =73%-76%
"C-"=70%-72%

"D+"=67%-69%
"D" =63%-66%
"D-"=60%-62%

Grade of Fail (F) 

Grades of Fail will be earned by those students who:

  1. Earn below 60%; and/or
    2) Do not do ALL the work required