Social Studies

Humanities I – World Studies – All Nations
Open to: All 9th grade All Nations students
Co-Requsite: Humanities I/English – All Nations
Length: Year-long
This course is part of an English/Social Studies pairing. It encompasses world history, classical literature, Native American Literature and stories, philosophy, and the fine arts. There is reading, writing, and research, with opportunities to pursue in-depth study of some phases of the Humanities. There is a focus on the indigenous peoples of the Americas and the subsequent change over time after European contact.

Humanities 1 - World Studies – Liberal Arts
Open to: All 9th grade Liberal Arts students
Co-requisite: Humanities 1/English – Liberal Arts
Length: Year-long
Humanities 1 is a yearlong course and may be used as a substitute for World Studies. This course is part of an English/Social Studies pairing. It encompasses world history, classical literature, philosophy, and the fine arts. There is reading, writing, and research, with opportunities to pursue in-depth study of some phases of the Humanities.

Honors World Studies
Open to: All 9th grade Open students
Length: Year-long
The Honors World Studies course is designed to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in international cultures throughout history and their causes and consequences. The course builds on an understanding of cultural institutional, and technological advances that set the human stage. Further, the course will focus on developing students‘ critical thinking, verbal and writing skills to meet the demands of higher level social studies courses.

AP United States History
Open to: All 10th grade Open students
Length: Year-long
AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college course in a high school setting. It is a year-long survey of American history from the age of exploration to the present presented thematically. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and historiography. The course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement American History Exam in May. Some colleges and universities may grant college credit and/or advanced placement based on the score received on the exam.

AP Humanities 2-United States History – All Nations
Open to: All 10th grade All Nations students
Co-requisite: Humanities 2/English Dept.
Length: Year-long
Paired with Humanities 2/ English, this course will use primary documents and literature to understand the American Indian perspective of United States History. AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college course in a high school setting. It is a year-long survey of American history highlighting the successes and struggles of American Indians from pre-European Contact through the present. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and historiography.

AP Humanities 2-United States History – Liberal Arts
Open to: All 10th grade Liberal Arts students
Co-requisite: Humanities 2/English Dept.
Length: Year-long
AP U.S. History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshman college course in a high school setting. It is a year-long survey of American history from the age of exploration to the present. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and historiography. The course prepares the student to take the Advanced Placement American History Exam in May. Some colleges and universities may grant college credit and/or advanced placement based on the score received on the exam.

AP Human Geography
Open to: All 11th grade students
Length: Semester
The purpose of the AP course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth‘s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences in a global context. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.

Government/Economics
Open to: All 11th grade students
Length: Semester
The government component covers topics primarily concerned with the United States government at all levels – federal, legislative, and judicial. The Constitution, voting behavior, and the three branches will all be addressed. Analyzing Supreme Court decisions and staging mock trials will also be important tools in this section of the class. The economics component covers basic concepts used in both micro and macro economics. Topics such as supply and demand, productivity, taxation and investment, inflation and gross national and domestic product are introduced.

Partnership Social Studies
Open to: 10th,11th, and 12th grade students who are behind in Social Studies credit
Prerequisite: Pre-approval by program staff
Length: Semester
Partnership Social Studies offers classes emphasizing government, economics, or history offered over the school year. Students encounter material presented a variety of ways: reading, speakers, videos, and hands on projects. One class, environmental studies, exposes students to the impact of economics, cultural lifestyle, and technology on the environment. Contract courses are also offered. The individualized material is geared toward United States History and government. The student must read, summarize, and/or analyze the selected readings. Permission is required for contract courses. The possibility exists to earn more than one credit.

CIS Economics
Open to: All 12th grade students
Prerequisite: Teacher approval
Length: Semester
CIS Economics is a college Principles of Micro-Economics course. Students will gain knowledge of all Economic principles. They will be challenged with rigorous teaching and instruction methods and become accustomed to a full college course work load. An added benefit, is that the on-campus class allows the student to maintain regular high school activities. College in the Schools Economics is a concurrent enrollment program administered by the College of Continuing Education at the University of Minnesota (UMN). When enrolled in a South High/UMN course through CIS, you are eligible to receive both high school and college credit for your work. You get a jump-start on college while concurrently satisfying high school requirements. The content, teaching and assessment of CIS courses are the same as the UMN‘s on-campus courses. The government component covers topics primarily concerned with the United States government at all levels – federal, legislative, and judicial. The Constitution, voting behavior, and the three branches will all be addressed. Analyzing Supreme Court decisions and staging mock trials will also be important tools in this section of the class.

CIS Government
Open to: All 12th grade students
Prerequisite: Teacher approval
Length: Semester
CIS Government is a rigorous UMN Political Science class (POL 1001) being offered through South High School. Entitled, American Democracy in a Changing World, it is intended to introduce students to the expressed hopes of the American people for their government and to the institutions and processes that have been created and recreated to achieve these hopes. What do we mean by good government? Have we achieved it? How do we build it? Through an examination of the roles of American political institutions and the behavior of American citizens, we will be able to critically reflect on issues such as political and economic inequality in the U.S., the role of American political and economic power in the world, and the possibility for an American public policy that lives up to the ideals of the founders. By the end of the semester students should have a basic understanding of the structure and function of American government as well as an increased ability to critically reflect on the degree to which our institutions, processes, and citizens live up to the expectations placed on them. A variety of teaching styles and strategies will be used, depending on the topic under investigation. The class will include lecture, video, class discussion and group projects. Use of economic principles will complement our study of the role of the United States government at all levels - federal, legislative, and judicial. The Constitution, voting behavior, and the three branches will all be addressed. Analyzing Supreme Court decisions and staging mock trials will also be important tools in this section of the class.
COURSE GOALS:
•To increase understanding of the basic the structure and function of the US Government.
•To increase awareness and comprehension of contemporary political issues.
•To motivate the use of connecting economic concepts and principles to analyze and evaluate contemporary governmental and social issues.

The Great War [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
This World War I course examines the combatants, strategy and tactics, technological innovation vs. converatism; the war in France; the war at sea; America‘s role; the peace settlement; and the occupation. While military aspects of the conflict are studied, the primary focus places the Great War in specific areas which include political and diplomatic developments, new developments in weapons technology, economic aspects of war, and the impact of the war on the culture and social order of the nations involved in the struggle.

World War II [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
This is a Social Studies elective analyzing Germany‘s and Americas‘ involvement in WWII. Students will examine economic and social issues in respect to the War time political situation. The war will be studied with respect to the German army and it‘s role within Germany along with America‘s response to the global conflict. Students will also analyze the two countries actions before the war began. Students will use historical documents and text, along with contemporary writings to comprehend Germany‘s and America‘s roles in the war. Students will be expected to read, research, and discuss the issues and complete a major project.

H-Art
Open to: All 11th & 12th grade students
Co-requisite: Students must also register for H-Art/English
Length: Semester
H-Art is an interdisciplinary course offering English and Social Studies credit. Each year a common theme is chosen for students to study and research. Research, writing, public performance skills and the artistry of many cultures are emphasized. The students incorporate what they learn into a play script and performance that they produce in collaboration with the Illusion Theater. The theme is also used in the writings for the book that is created with the Minnesota Book Arts partnership project. Students work with the Heart of the Beast Puppet Theater and are a part of the community May Day Parade. Other artists, art agencies, and speakers work with the students throughout the semester as needed to complete the projects.

Holocaust [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
This course will look at the era of history known as the Holocaust. There will be discussion, research, and include many speakers on the topic.

Indigenous People’s Seminar [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
This class will be dedicated to the wider understanding and appreciation of the ideas and knowledge of indigenous peoples and the social, economic and political realities of indigenous nations around the world. Using both a historical and sociological lens, students will analyze the structural and cultural variables underlying the complex relationships between Indigenous communities and mainstream society.

Psychology [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
The Psychology component will include units on basic theories, the brain, personality, sleep/dream issues and Developmental Psychology with an emphasis on Adolescents. Different psychological methods will be researched and employed to help form deeper understandings of developmental theories, issues concerning emotions/conflict/stress, and to debate issues as diverse as heredity/environment, and parapsychology. In addition to completing core assignments, students are required to complete core options related to the course.

Developmental Psychology-Open [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
The Developmental Psychology component will examine the overarching theory behind how we develop as individuals with a focus on Adolescent Psychology. The course will examine from prenatal, birth, infancy and childhood, adolescence, and adult development. This course will be taught through Progressive education approach to learning and application of concepts, theories and ideas into analysis, and real world understanding and experiences. Abnormal Psychology-Open [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
The Abnormal Psychology 200 component will examine the overarching concepts and issues surrounding Abnormal Psychology such as Designed to provide students with an introduction to theories and research concerning abnormal behavior. The course will address such topics as the incidence (frequency) of abnormal behavior of various types; how abnormal behaviors are classified into various diagnostic categories; the etiologies (causes) of psychological disorders; and the variety of methods employed in the treatment of abnormal behavior.

Sociology [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
The Sociology component will examine the patterns of human interaction. The following units will be examined: sociology terms, methods, culture, socialization, deviance, groups, family, social stratification, social change, and collective behavior. In addition to completing core assignments, papers, presentations and discussion.

Socioloy-Societal Issues – Open [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
The study of Societal Issues component will examine the overaching societal issues surrounding social inequalities, movements, and reform. The following units will examine race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. This course will be taught through the Progressive education approach to learning an application of concepts, theories and ideas into analysis, and real world understanding and experiences.

Sociology of Modern Metropolis-Open [offered on a rotating basis]
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
This is an analysis of neighborhoods, cities, suburbs and utopian communities; the examination of major trends in urbanization and the evaluation of urban and community policies. This course provides an overview of the patterns, problems and persistence of cities. We study the relationship between cities and society; including how this relationship has changed as societies have developed. Theories and approaches to urban planning and the shaping of metropolitan areas.

Stock Market
Open to: All 12th grade students
Length: Semester
Stock Market is an upper-level junior/senior class that provides students with the opportunity to learn about and appreciate the way the US and international stock markets operate. Students will study markets, analyze companies and predict business cycle fluctuations and market trends. They individually present their findings and make recommendations as to the pros and cons of owning certain companies. The class will discuss and debate the merits of each company‘s assets and liabilities and determine if it should be added to, remain in, or removed from our portfolio. The class then votes on those companies and decides to actually buy or sell part ownership in them, stock, based entirely on their classmates‘ recommendations.

V.O.I.C.E.S. - (Values, Options, Issues and Choices for Society)
Open to: All 12th grade students by application
Co-requisite: Students must also register for V.O.I.C.E.S.-English
Length: Year-long
V.O.I.C.E.S. is an interdisciplinary, collaborative humanities/social science class for seniors offered in cooperation with the Minneapolis Telecommunication Network. Students research and analyze social issues and produce video projects that are aired on cable television. The class often leaves school to visit with community resource people such as government officials, community organizers, artists, authors, and Humphrey Fellows. In addition, we participate in several all day retreats, attend plays, art exhibitions, and visit government and community sites. Students tutor one day each week for half the year at Anderson School and volunteer in various community settings. This direct experience is combined with classroom instruction, reflection, and much discussion. Students keep daily journals about their class experiences. This yearlong course is divided into three themes: Creating Human Society, Moral Issues in Contemporary Society, and Perception and Society. Class activities and projects follow these themes.

Native V.O.I.C.E.S. - (Values, Options, Issues and Choices for Society)
Open to: All 12th grade students
Co-requisite: Students must also register for Native V.O.I.C.E.S.-English
Length: Year-long
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a perspective of American Indian tribal communities government and economics through analysis of the Indian tribal and treaty rights in the United States. We will examine and analyze primary documents of the relationship between Indian tribes and the United States government. This course will build critical thinking skills and promote social activism through a global lens.